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The City of Longmont has a total of 22 citizen based boards, committees and commissions on which approximately 160 citizens serve. Generally, the terms board, committee, commission, and authority are synonymous, however, there are a few differences in the functions and powers of some boards. The provisions for the City’s boards and commissions are set forth in Article VII of the City Charter.

Advisory Boards

The majority of City boards operate in an advisory capacity to the City Council and are made up of between five and eleven members with at least one staff liaison and a secretary. Each board reviews, discusses and makes recommendations to City Council on a variety of issues associated with its function. Recommendations from advisory boards are forwarded to the City Council which has the final decision-making responsibility. The City Council carefully weighs board recommendations with citizen, business owner, staff, and other interested party comments to arrive at a decision which Council believes is in the overall best interest of the Longmont community.

Quasi-Judicial Boards

In addition to the advisory boards, the City of Longmont has two quasi-judicial boards--the Board of Adjustment and Appeals and the Master Board of Appeals-- which deal with requests for exceptions to various building codes. These boards are given specific powers through State statutes and deal with specific items which, at one time, Council heard and made decisions on at its regular meetings.

Authority to act is given to specific boards by ordinances, delegating Council's decision-making power to them. Unlike the advisory board recommendations, the decisions made by the quasi-judicial boards are final and can only be appealed to, and overturned by, a court.

With few exceptions, the meetings of City Council and any of its appointed boards are open to the public. Citizen participation is encouraged and welcomed at these meetings. Council and staff believe that the more involved citizens are in the early stages of program and legislation development, the better local government can meet the needs and expectations of the community. 

Task Forces


Task forces are committees that Council sets up from time to time to focus on a specific item or task. A task force is given direction from Council and serves only until the task for which it was created is accomplished. In the past, Council has created task forces for such items as establishing priorities for Parks and Recreation needs, reviewing potential uses for the Carnegie building, and making recommendations on a solid waste collection program. The size of these committees can vary from a few individuals to many depending on the issue and the scope of the assigned task.

With few exceptions, the meetings of City Council and any of its appointed boards are open to the public. Citizen participation is encouraged and welcomed at these meetings. Council and staff believe that the more involved citizens are in the early stages of program and legislation development, the better local government can meet the needs and expectations of this community.

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